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      United States Coast Guard Auxiliary
         8th Eastern Region, Flotilla 6-10

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Boating Classes Available Through the Auxiliary

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Schedule of classes for Southwest Ohio

To add a class to this list
(PE Officers)

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AMERICA'S BOATING COURSE
ABC is 8 lessons, designed for all boaters

America's Boating Course is a joint project between The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary and the United States Power Squadrons.  In addition, the course has been approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators.

Topics include:

INTRODUCTION TO BOATING -- types of boats; different uses of boats; outboard, stern-drive, and inboard engines; jet drives.

BOATING LAWS -- boat registration; hull identification number; required safety equipment; operating safely and reporting accidents; protecting the marine environment; Federal boating laws; and PWCs.

PERSONAL SAFETY EQUIPMENT -- personal flotation devices  ("life jackets"); fire extinguishers; sound-producing devices; visual-distress signals; first aid kit; anchor; safety equipment and PWC.

SAFE BOAT HANDLING -- bow riding; substance abuse; entering, loading, and trimming a boat; fueling portable and permanent tanks; steering with a tiller and a wheel; docking and mooring; knots; filing a float plan; checking equipment, fuel, weather, and tide; using charts; choosing and using an anchor; safe PWC handling.

NAVIGATION -- the U.S. Aids to Navigation system; types of buoys and beacons; navigation rules; avoiding collisions; sound signals; PWX "tunnel vision."

BOATING PROBLEMS -- hypothermia; boating accidents and rescues; capsizing; running aground; emergency radio calls; engine problems; boating problems and PWC.

TRAILERING, STORING, AND PROTECTING YOUR BOAT -- types of trailers; trailer brakes, lights, hitches, tires, and bearings; loading, balancing, and towing a trailer; towing (and backing) a trailer; boat launching and retrieving; boat storage and theft protection; launching, retrieving, and storing a PWC.

HUNTING AND FISHING, WATER SKIING, AND RIVER BOATING -- carrying hunting gear and weapons in a boat; fishing from a boat; water skiing safety guidelines and hand signals; water skiing with a PWC; navigating rivers.

Many insurance companies will offer discounts on boat insurance to individuals who successfully complete boating courses such as this.  Individuals who successfully complete the course and exam are awarded certificates and cards.
Picture of Boating Skills and Seamanship Book
 BOATING SKILLS & SEAMANSHIP COURSE
BS&S is 6 to 13 lesions,  designed for power boaters

The U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary's Boating Skills and Seamanship (BS&S) course is a comprehensive course designed for both the experienced and the novice boater. The course consists of 6 required two-hour lessons plus elective modules, providing up-to-date knowledge for handling boats in all conditions.

Topics include:

WHICH BOAT IS FOR YOU? -- boater's language; types of boats; outboard motors and stern drives; hull design; uses of boats; other power plants; materials for constructing boats; your intended use; the Coast Guard Customer Info line; marine surveyors; buying a boat.

EQUIPMENT FOR YOUR BOAT -- requirements for your boat; your boat's equipment; legal considerations; substance abuse; boating accident reports; Courtesy Marine Examinations.

TRAILERING YOUR BOAT -- legal considerations; practical considerations; the towing vehicle; balancing the load; handling your trailer; pre-departure checks; preparing to launch; launching; retrieving; storing your boat and trailer; theft prevention; Zebra mussels; float plan.

HANDLING YOUR BOAT -- leave with a full tank; fueling your boat; your boat's propeller; cars and boats; twin screws;  jet drives; loading your boat; getting started; leaving a pier; "man" overboard; docking; mooring to a permanent anchor; anchoring; towing a skier; heavy weather; small boat safety.

YOUR "HIGHWAY" SIGNS -- protection of ATONs; buoyage systems; waterway marks; how waterways are marked; light characteristics; chart symbols; light structures; lights on bridges; electronic aids to navigation; a word to the wise; navigation publications.

THE RULES YOU MUST FOLLOW -- two sets of rules; to whom do the rules apply; what is a vessel; the general responsibility rule; general considerations; conduct in narrow channels; traffic separation schemes; vessel traffic services; stand-on or give-way; rules for special vessels; risk of collision; bend signals; restricted visibility; vessel lights and shapes; vessels at anchor; diving operations; distress signals; drawbridge signals; penalties.

PILOTING YOUR BOAT -- piloting tools; maps and charts; chart features; your chart's general information block; other charted information; your magnetic compass; position on the earth's surface; locating a point on a chart; distance on the earth's surface; measuring distance; course plotting; sources of compass error; correcting a compass reading; positioning; speed-time-distance; dead reckoning; practice your art.

POWERING YOUR BOAT -- types of marine engines; marine engines; selecting a propeller; induction systems; ignition systems; flame arresters; cooling systems; gasoline considerations; batteries; maintenance; winterizing your boat; spring fitting-out; troubleshooting.

LINES AND KNOTS FOR YOUR BOAT -- line or rope; rope materials; kinds of rope; measuring rope; selecting your ropes; care of rope; making up line; knots, bends, and hitches; splices; securing lines; dipping the eye.
 

WEATHER AND BOATING -- sources of weather information; wind and boating; wind and waves; understanding weather; weather and heat; fog; non-frontal weather.

YOUR BOAT'S RADIO -- radios used on boats; functions of radios; licenses; selecting your VHF-FM radio; installation; operating your VHF-FM; maintain a radio watch; channels have special purposes; some "no nos"; copies of the rules; calling another station; procedure words; phonetic alphabet; routine radio check; distress, urgency, and safety calls; crew training.

INLAND BOATING -- types of inland waters; inland navigation; inland seamanship; river currents; maintaining inland waterways; dams; locks; river charts; commercial traffic; before you go
.

THE REST OF OUR STORY -- small boat safety; personal watercraft; hypothermia; motorboats and sailboats; carbon monoxide poisoning; float plan; U.S. Coast Guard District Offices; instructions for using a course plotter; metric conversion system.

Many insurance companies will offer discounts on boat insurance to individuals
who successfully complete this course. Individuals who successfully complete the
course and exam are awarded certificates and cards. Except for a book fee
and a possible room rental fee, the course is free.
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Picture of Advanced Coastal Navigation Book
ADVANCED COASTAL NAVIGATION COURSE
ACN Course is 12 lessons and is designed for all boaters

The U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary's Advanced Coastal Navigation (ACN) course is a comprehensive course to prepare the advanced boater with the knowledge needed to safely pilot a boat.

Topics include:

INTRODUCTION TO COASTAL NAVIGATION -- course overview; names and definitions of various types of navigation; steps of voyage planning and underway navigation; earth's coordinate system and its use to specify location; how direction can be measured on the surface; conversion of direction (true, magnetic, compass and relative) to another.
 
THE MARINE MAGNETIC COMPASS -- parts and principle of operation of the marine magnetic compass; concept of deviation and distinctions between compass north, magnetic north, and true north; "swinging ship" and deviation table preparation; rapidly and reliably solving TVMDC and/or CDMVT computations.

THE NAUTICAL CHART -- characteristics of nautical charts, particularly Mercator and polyconic projections; plotting positions in terms of latitude and longitude; various chart types/scales and their appropriate uses; basic knowledge of chart symbols; rapid and reliable measurement of direction, distance, and location on Mercator and polyconic nautical charts.

THE NAVIGATOR'S TOOLS AND INSTRUMENTS -- navigator tools used in everyday practice; basic skills and familiarity with the use of plotting instruments; use of other instruments and equipment used in the practice of navigation.

DEAD RECKONING -- working knowledge of dead reckoning methods including plotting, labeling, measuring, and determining DR positions; speed, time, distance formulas and problem solving; speed estimation, tachometers and speed curves.

PILOTING -- Line of Position (LOP) concepts; bearing use in LOPs; running fix by advancing or retiring an LOP; danger bearings; estimated positions when the data are lacking for a FIX.

CURRENT SAILING -- understanding current and the motion of the vessel; current problems on both the nautical chart and maneuvering board including determination of EP given set and drift, course steered, and speed maintained; determination of actual set and drift given course steered, speed maintained, and a FIX; determination of course to steer and resultant SOA given set and drift and intended track; determination of course to steer and speed to maintain given specified track and speed of advance and current set and drift.

TIDES AND TIDAL CURRENTS -- understanding tidal phenomena, causes, and typical variations; appreciate the practical reasons why tides are important to the mariner; know how to use the Tide Tables to estimate the height of the tide
at any time; know how to use the Tidal Current Tables to estimate the strength and direction of the current at any time.

RADIO NAVIGATION -- understanding the basics of RDF, Loran-C, Radar, and GPS, their respective advantages, disadvantages, limitations and how they can be used to fix position; radar use for collision- avoidance CPA and target course and speed.

NAVIGATION REFERENCE PUBLICATIONS -- Acquaintance with the U.S. Coast Pilot, the Light List, and the Notices to Mariners; computation of visibility of lights given height of light, observer, prevailing visibility and nominal ranges; importance of up-to-date charts and other publications.

FUEL AND VOYAGE PLANNING -- Understand the basics of fuel planning, including the definitions of fuel efficiency, fuel reserves, endurance, and range; fuel consumption affects of such factors as hull design, engine horsepower, throttle
settings, condition of bottom etc.; developing a fuel consumption curve; effects of current in fuel planning; preparing and using a "Howgozit" chart for a voyage.

REFLECTIONS -- Examples of 10 principles of navigation learned the hard way.


Except for a book fee and a possible room rental fee, the course is free.
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BASIC COASTAL NAVIGATION COURSE
BCN is 8 lessons, designed for all boaters

The U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary's Basic Coastal Navigation (BCN) course is a comprehensive course to introduce the advanced boater to the methods needed to safely pilot a boat.

Topics include:

INTRODUCTION TO COASTAL NAVIGATION -- course overview; names and definitions of various types of navigation; steps of voyage planning and underway navigation; earth's coordinate system and its use to specify location; how direction can be measured on the surface; conversion of direction (true, magnetic, compass and relative) to another.

THE MARINE MAGNETIC COMPASS -- parts and principle of operation of the marine magnetic compass; concept of deviation and distinctions between compass north, magnetic north, and true north; "swinging ship" and deviation table preparation; rapidly and reliably solving TVMDC and/or CDMVT computations.

THE NAUTICAL CHART -- characteristics of nautical charts, particularly Mercator and polyconic projections; plotting positions in terms of latitude and longitude; various chart types/scales and their appropriate uses; basic knowledge of chart symbols; rapid and reliable measurement of direction, distance, and location on Mercator and polyconic nautical charts.

THE NAVIGATOR'S TOOLS AND INSTRUMENTS -- navigator tools used in everyday practice; basic skills and familiarity with the use of plotting instruments; use of other instruments and equipment used in the practice of navigation.

DEAD RECKONING -- working knowledge of dead reckoning methods including plotting, labeling, measuring, and determining DR positions; speed, time, distance formulas and problem solving; speed estimation, tachometers and speed curves.

PILOTING -- Line of Position (LOP) concepts; bearing use in LOPs; running fix by advancing or retiring an LOP; danger bearings; estimated positions when the data are lacking for a FIX.

Except for a book fee and a possible room rental fee, the course is free.
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Boating Fun Book Cover
BOATING FUN - ADVENTURE ON THE WATER
BF is a one hour class for ages 4-9

Boat Safe Kids Picture

Boating Fun - Adventure on the Water, was written in partnership with the Army Corps of Engineers. It is a storybook/coloring book (targeted to children in grades K-3) with pictures that are suitable for making overhead transparencies. A guide to the safe boating messages in the book, as well as a list of activities (with short explanations), can be found in the book on Pages 1-2. The story contains all the safe boating messages and, in addition, Key Messages for the pictures are separately listed on each page where the related picture is found. The book is designed to be used in traditional, instructor-led classes as well as stand-alone study by a single user.

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Boating Safely Book Cover
BOATING SAFELY COURSE
BSC is an 8 hour course, designed for all boaters

Boating Safely is a eight-hour, eight-chapter course designed to appeal to hunters, anglers, personal watercraft operators and other boaters who cannot find time for a full, comprehensive course. Boating Safely was developed by the U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary in cooperation with the
U. S. Power Squadrons and Mosby Lifeline, and is approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA). It is also approved by most of the states which require formal instruction in order to operate a boat.

Topics include:

INTRODUCTION TO BOATING -- types of boats; different uses of boats; outboard, stern-drive, and inboard engines; jet drives.

BOATING LAWS -- boat registration; hull identification number; required safety equipment; operating safely and reporting accidents; protecting the marine environment; boating laws and PWCs.

PERSONAL SAFETY EQUIPMENT -- personal flotation devices ("life jackets"); fire extinguishers; sound-producing devices; visual-distress signals; first aid kit; anchor; safety equipment and PWC.

SAFE BOAT HANDLING -- bow riding; substance abuse; entering, loading, and trimming a boat; fueling portable and permanent tanks; steering with a tiller and a wheel; docking and mooring; knots; filing a float plan; checking equipment, fuel, weather, and
tide; using charts; choosing and using an anchor; safe PWC handling.

NAVIGATION -- the U.S. Aids to Navigation system; types of buoys and beacons; navigation rules; avoiding collisions; sound signals; PWX "tunnel vision."

BOATING PROBLEMS -- hypothermia; boating accidents and rescues; capsizing; running aground; emergency radio calls; engine problems; boating problems and PWC.

TRAILERING, STORING, AND PROTECTING YOUR BOAT -- types of trailers; trailer brakes, lights, hitches, tires, and bearings; loading, balancing, and towing a trailer; towing (and backing) a trailer; boat launching and retrieving; boat storage
and theft protection; launching, retrieving, and storing a PWC.

HUNTING AND FISHING, WATER SKIING, AND RIVER BOATING -- carrying hunting gear and weapons in a boat; fishing from a boat; water skiing safety guidelines and hand signals; water skiing with a PWC; navigating rivers.

Many insurance companies will offer discounts on boat insurance to individuals who successfully complete this course. Individuals who successfully complete the course and exam are awarded certificates and cards.

Except for a book fee and a possible room rental fee, the course is free.
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Navigating With GPS Book Cover
NAVIGATING WITH GPS COURSE
GPS is a two hour course, designed for all boaters

Navigating with GPS was developed jointly by the U S Coast Guard Auxiliary and the Canadian Power and Sail Squadrons. Although a foundation in principles of navigation is recommended, a brief review of navigation is provided. The two-hour course provides a very basic introduction to the nature of the Global Positioning System as well as basic receiver functions with special attention to selecting a receiver and doing simple way point navigation. It is not intended to teach the operation of any particular GPS receiver.

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Personal Watercraft Book Cover

PERSONAL WATERCRAFT (PWC) ONE-HOUR COURSE
PWC is an one hour course, designed for all boaters

The U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary's Personal Watercraft course is a very basic, one-hour introduction to the safety issues involved when operating a PWC. Because of its brevity, it is not approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA) nor is it approved by most of the states which require formal instruction in order to operate a boat (the Auxiliary's Boating Safely, Boating Skills & Seamanship and Sailing Fundamentals courses are more appropriate for
meeting legal requirements). The purpose of the course and its associated text, Personal Watercraft Rider's Handbook, is to teach that PWCs are boats and that their skippers have legal responsibilities and should learn the "rules of the road."

Individuals who successfully complete the course and exam are awarded certificates and cards.
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Sailing Fundamentals Course Book

SAILING FUNDAMENTALS COURSE
SF includes 7-14 lessons, and is designed for sailors

The U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary's Sailing Fundamentals (SF) course combines the training programs of the American Sailing Association and the U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. Graduates of this seven-lesson course (approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA)) will be credited with completion of the classroom portion of the ASA class.

Topics include:

INTRODUCTION TO SAILING -- the sailboat and the wind; the basic boat; responsibilities of the skipper and crew; alcohol and drug abuse; federal requirements for recreational boats; attaching and raising sails; getting the boat moving; tacking and jibing; ending the sail; docking.

BASIC SAILING -- sail trim; what makes a boat sail; points of sail; rules of the road under sail; communications; stopping the boat.

SAFETY AND SEAMANSHIP -- safety harness; deck safety; hypothermia and clothing; seasickness; rescuing a man overboard; sailing in confined waters.

BASIC SEAMANSHIP SKILLS -- day sail planning; chart symbols; aids to navigation; anchors and their uses; knots; dock lines; anchoring; docking and mooring under sail.

BASIC COASTAL CRUISING I -- running lights; duties of skipper and crew for cruising; rules of the road under power;
essential safety equipment; outboard engine operations; troubleshooting the engine; handling a vessel under power.

BASIC COASTAL CRUISING II -- sail selection; weather; heavy-weather sailing; reefing systems; the magnetic compass;
preparing for coastal cruising; running aground and other nuisances; reefing; sailing a compass course; steering with the sails.

SPECIAL SAILING INFORMATION -- dinghy sailing; sailboards, catamarans; launching, storing, and maintaining your boat. A laminated color chart of U.S. Aids to Navigation System is included.

Many insurance companies will offer discounts on boat insurance to individuals who successfully complete this course. Individuals who successfully complete the
course and exam are awarded certificates and cards.


Except for a book fee and a possible room rental fee, the course is free.

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Waypoints Book Cover

WAY POINTS - A GUIDE TO BOATING SAFELY
WP is a 1 to 3 hour course for 10 to 12 year olds



Way points - A Guide to Boating Safely, was written in partnership with the Army Corps of Engineers. It is targeted to youth in grades 4-6. Its look and reading style (as well as the "One Minute Mysteries," which foster discussion) appeals to the 10-12 year old age range. It includes many of the main points of our adult 8-hr Boating Safely Course.

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   Last Update 08FEB07
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